fabric406 Blog — Tutorials_Beginning Blocks

Churn Dash Quilt Block and Variation

Posted by Elaine Huff on

Churn Dash Quilt Block and Variation
So today we're going to look at the easy beginner Churn Dash quilt block. I also did a variation that I'll show at the end. This is one of those basic traditional quilt blocks that can be used in many different ways. Of course being a basic block, it has lots of other names like Broken Plate, Double Monkey Wrench, Fisherman's Reel, Puss in the Corner, and Quail's Nest to name a few!

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How to Sew a Basic Snowball Block

Posted by Elaine Huff on

How to Sew a Basic Snowball Block
The Snowball Block is another simple block that can be used in making other blocks and it also makes a good alternating block in a quilt.

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How to Sew a Basic Hourglass or Quarter Square Triangle Block

Posted by Elaine Huff on

How to Sew a Basic Hourglass or Quarter Square Triangle Block
The hourglass patch/block goes by several names – quarter-square triangle is a more common one. It starts out as a half-square triangle patch so the first part of this tutorial is much the same as my post on that subject. 

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Free Pattern for a Basic Roman Stripe Block

Posted by Elaine Huff on

Free Pattern for a Basic Roman Stripe Block
The super easy Roman Stripe quilt block can be used by itself or as a component of lots of other blocks. I’ve always called it a Rail Fence block, but I guess the name “Rail Fence” is for blocks that have more than 3 stripes in them – so I guess my fence only has 3 rails in it – lol!

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Free Pattern - Log Cabin Quilt Block

Posted by Elaine Huff on

Free Pattern - Log Cabin Quilt Block
Sewing a Log Cabin block is fairly easy – just straight sewing. However, it is important to have an accurate 1/4″ seam allowance. For my example, I’m using 2″ strips and squares, but you can use whatever size you like. Traditionally, half of the strips are lighter and half are darker but I’ve seen gorgeous quilts made with all light tone-on-tone beiges/whites and ones made with only one color – like all your green scraps.

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